Five realities to take into account before leaving your job - Companies

Five realities to take into account before leaving your job – Companies

Do you see your future as an entrepreneur as a way to make your life easier? Be careful, it is often the opposite that happens.

“It took me three years to admit to those around me that I wanted to start my business. At times I felt a sense of remorse or wastage over studies that were no longer going to be useless. to my parents that I had studied to find myself in manual work…” If the parents of Alessandra Teston were surprised at the change of path of their daughter who left a communication agency to embark on the marketing of wines, the transition went quite well.

“It took me three years to admit to those around me that I wanted to start my business. At times I felt a sense of remorse or wastage over studies that were no longer going to be useless. to my parents that I had studied to find myself in manual work…” If the parents of Alessandra Teston were surprised at the change of path of their daughter who left a communication agency to embark on the marketing of wines, the transition went quite well. But it is very common for the change of life to surprise, even worry. Leaving a stable situation in a more or less large company with a salary that falls every month can frighten those around you who will worry about you and could try to dissuade you. Gaëlle Helsmoortel also noticed surprise around her when she announced that she was leaving, after 12 years, a well-placed job at L’Oréal to become independent. “My relatives asked me why, when I had a senior executive position, big benefits, a car, etc.”. In a fairly popular post on the Medium platform, titled How I screwed up my life by quitting my corporate job to create my dream start-up, an entrepreneur points to the reactions of those around him: “My mother came close to the crisis It was not something a perfectionist mother wanted to hear, especially after encouraging me so much to graduate and valedictorian at the best business schools in the world.” The man also evokes the progressive isolation that gripped him when everyone asked him how his start-up was doing: “Day after day, I became more lonely, I avoided any opportunity to see people. My start-up was not growing as fast as I had imagined and I was tired of telling people that it took years for companies like Facebook… The only place I I felt good, it was alongside my few entrepreneurial friends…” Read also | They dropped everything to launch their box Tired of being accountable to a boss, to a company that does not take into account your opinion, your expertise or that does not take advantage of your multiple talents? There are many cases of employees hoping to find complete freedom in their own project. “The boss is me”, rejoice some. Nevertheless, even if you will be able to make your mark and make the decisions, in short direct your box as you see fit, you could become disillusioned by noting that a certain number of constraints will continue to be imposed on you. You will always have to perform tasks that you don’t like (for example administration or accounting) and you will not always have your hands 100% free: you will inevitably have to be accountable to your customers, to your partners or your investors. Read also | Alessandra Teston (Mosto): “Entrepreneurship is a great adventure on a human level””I never thought that I would be so alone and that I would put my relationship to the test to such an extent! At this level, I lived through very difficult years and I almost lost my wife.” The confession of this boss of a digital start-up denotes the positive discourse often heard, that of the entrepreneur who thanks his or her partner for the support provided. Reality is often a daily life that monopolizes a significant part of your time and your attention, forcing you to nibble on moments from your life as a couple or family: a barbecue at friends’ house that you will miss to finalize a file, the birthday of a loved one from whom you will have to slip away… This will not always be well perceived and it could well prove to be too heavy a time for your partner… Read also |Christophe Mausen & Céline Léonard (Les Bonbons de Grand -Mère), from the Chamber of Commerce to the candy workshop “It’s been two years since I paid myself to allow the box to take off.” This sentence, we hear it in the mouth of most project leaders who start. Indeed, few start-ups can quickly ensure generous salaries for their managers. And generally, the latter agree to defer their remuneration because they believe in the potential of their new company. “As an employee, I had a salary. Now I don’t have any more, admits Gauthier Henroz, the founder of the digital solutions company Chift. Since October of last year, I have been burning my savings But it’s a gamble and I’ll have to recover the savings invested later.” Unfortunately, such a bet is not always possible. And at first, you often have to agree to reduce your lifestyle. In the same Medium post quoted above, the author doesn’t go with the back of the spoon either: “Prepare for a smaller apartment and count your money, because there’s also so much ancillary costs during the process, accounting fees, lawyer fees, iPhone to replace or PC, etc.”. Read also | Amélie Jacques (Sheep Solution), a lawyer who became a shepherdess 2.0The author of the post on Medium also particularly points to the lack of sleep. And again, he does not use the language of wood: “By escaping from the world of the consulting business, I had thought that I was going to achieve the dream of making my own schedules and working according to my desires. This until I read the following quote, which we owe to Lori Greiner (an American entrepreneur very publicized through reality shows, Editor’s note): ‘Entrepreneurs agree to work 80 hours a week in order to escape the 40 hours.It all started with small awakenings during the night.At first, it was because I was too excited by my ideas and they were jostling in my head.J I was just having a hard time waiting for dawn so I could start working again. Then came the phase of overdoing it. I was working too much because I hadn’t had enough time to think about my ideas and that I always wanted to do more. But the more I worked, the later I went to bed and the more I I’m having trouble falling asleep. The quality of my sleep also deteriorated. In the end, I was spending two to three days a week being almost unproductive. Behind the scenes of success are many difficult days, sleepless nights, rejections and failures. The road to success is long”. Read also | Louis Falisse (Chocolow), carrots in chocolate

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