The return of nuclear power in Germany?  - Economic policy

The return of nuclear power in Germany? – Economic policy

Slowly but surely, the German government, where the ecologists sit, is seriously thinking about it, given the energy crisis and dependence on Russian gas.

Initially, the plan concocted by Angela Merkel provided for the closure of the last three nuclear power plants on December 31, marking Germany’s final exit from the atom. Called Isar 2, Emsland and Neckarwestheim 2, they still supply around 5% of Germany’s annual electricity needs, or 4.3 GW. It’s not much, but as Robert Habeck says…

Initially, the plan concocted by Angela Merkel provided for the closure of the last three nuclear power plants on December 31, marking Germany’s final exit from the atom. Called Isar 2, Emsland and Neckarwestheim 2, they still supply around 5% of Germany’s annual electricity needs, or 4.3 GW. It’s not much, but as Robert Habeck, Vice-Chancellor of the Greens and Minister for the Economy and Climate, says, “at this stage, every kWh counts!”. Not all the members of his party have such a clear-cut position, but realism, as in Belgium, is slowly gaining ground. For two months, the question of the extension of the last three nuclear power plants has settled in German political life, particularly in certain Länder where the renewable supposed to take over has developed more slowly. Especially in Bavaria, the birthplace of Isar 2. Last week, Chancellor Olaf Scholz opened the door to this extension for the first time. Faced with the problem of Russian gas, Germany is seeking to compensate for the risk of shortage by other sources of energy. After the reopening of coal-fired power plants, an extension of nuclear power? The question has not yet been settled because, as in Belgium, it presupposes a feasibility study and the availability of uranium. The results of an expertise conducted by the Ministry of the Economy are expected shortly. The certification body has already given its consent. The population is mostly in favor (41% even call for the construction of new power stations), green voters too (54%) but as the former Franco-German MEP Daniel Cohn-Bendit said, “this should not correspond to the exit from nuclear phase-out”.

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