Why do the trailers tell everything?  - Trends-Tendances - economic news in real time.

Why do the trailers tell everything? – Trends-Tendances – economic news in real time.

There was a time when we “went to the cinema”. Today, we need insurance before we travel. And it’s the trailer that delivers it to us.

For a long time, trailers have been accused of misleading the viewer. By delivering, for example, only the best gags (and sometimes the only ones) of a comedy or the most spectacular passages of an action film, even if it means giving a frankly distorted image of what the film really is . It’s fair game though. The trailer is a promotional medium. Its objective is obviously to ensure that we move in a cinema. Do we blame the trader for displaying only his finest products in the window to encourage us to push the door? And seducing, as we know, does not consist in showing everything, leaving room for the imagination.

For a long time, trailers have been accused of misleading the viewer. By delivering, for example, only the best gags (and sometimes the only ones) of a comedy or the most spectacular passages of an action film, even if it means giving a frankly distorted image of what the film really is . It’s fair game though. The trailer is a promotional medium. Its objective is obviously to ensure that we move in a cinema. Do we blame the trader for displaying only his finest products in the window to encourage us to push the door? And seducing, as we know, does not consist in showing everything, leaving room for the imagination. However, in recent years, we have seen an evolution in the opposite direction: the trailers are working, it seems, to hide nothing from us. To the point of becoming indigestible (sometimes exceeding 2’30”, which is endless, whether in theaters or on your smartphone, especially if you are exposed to it many times) by telling us about the film at length and wide. Previously, the trailers were content to deliver the issue of the film (“It’s the story of a man who…”) while throwing a few loose tracks like bait and trying to reveal some as little as possible on the course. From now on, the trailers, as they are now called, strive to reveal the whole plot. Not only the stake but also its successive developments. As if its designers had wanted to shoehorn the whole plot into 2’30”. This approach may seem a priori counterproductive. However, there is a logic to this: it is quite simply our fault. Yes, we, potential spectators, can no longer bear to be surprised. We want to know exactly what we are going to see before we go. Moreover, the designers of trailers attest to it: the more the public knows about the film, the more there is a chance that it will move. And it is better to deliver too much than not enough, even if it means letting out a few spoilers as was the case for certain films. Law of desire versus law of the market. It’s because times have changed. There was a time when we “went to the cinema”: we found ourselves in front of a multiplex and we decided at the last moment which film we were going to see. Then came successively video (VHS, then DVD), cable and streaming, further expanding the offer. Today, having all the choice of “content” just a click away at home, “we’re going to see such and such a film”. We need insurance before we travel. And it’s the trailer that delivers it to us. We could be delighted with this effort of transparency and information about the film, except that the narrative formatting in 2’30” leaving no room for the imagination, can only be used for films that meet already to this preformatted logic (e.g. superhero franchises). On the other hand, the works which want to surprise with more original narrative proposals find themselves particularly badly served by the narrative straitjacket of the trailer. One thinks, for example, of the Year of the Shark by Ludovic and Zoran Boukherma released this summer, reduced by the trailer to a pure “French comedy” when it is a much more original, inventive proposal. and exciting playing genres. If before the trailers could deceive us by default, today they tend to deceive us by excess. With the fear that by reducing the imagination in the trailers, we will also end up reducing it on the screen. Trailers of all movies, free yourself!

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