The Killer Who Didn't Like Villains PC Trends

The Killer Who Didn’t Like Villains PC Trends

In recounting Billy Summers’ last mission, Stephen King gives us a gripping novel about redemption and writing.

“Fiction is not truth. Fiction is the way to truth.” This reflection taken from Billy Summers, Stephen King’s latest thriller, confirms that throughout his work, the American writer talks above all about his job. This is even more evident with this new novel where he stages a forty-year-old hitman who …

“Fiction is not truth. Fiction is the way to truth.” This reflection taken from Billy Summers, Stephen King’s latest thriller, confirms that throughout his work, the American writer talks above all about his job. It’s even more obvious with this new novel where he stages a hitman in his forties who wants to get off the hook and accepts one last mission. For 2 million dollars, he must eliminate a killer when this one goes up the steps of the court to attend his trial. But the date of the hearing not yet being fixed, Billy is forced to wait in this provincial town where his sponsors have rented him a house in a residential area and an office just opposite the court. For several weeks, he will therefore live under a false identity: that of a writer. Which is pretty good since writing has always attracted our killer and he has things to tell. Billy Summers is a hybrid story, putting in parallel what goes on in the head of this killer who only eliminates “bad guys”, murderers or pedophiles, and the story of his life. His mother beaten, his sister murdered, his first death, the house of correction and the war in Iraq where he will learn his “trade” of sniper. Once his contract is completed, begins the second part of the novel, where Billy Summers will have a decisive encounter. As in Misery or Lisey’s Story, literature is the main subject of this novel. King immerses us in all that writing can change in the life of those who rub shoulders with it. And this dimension is as exciting as the thriller itself, especially since at one point in his story, the author traps us in a mise en abyme. A delight.

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