Thermal battery: for the planet, storing heat - Companies

Thermal battery: for the planet, storing heat – Companies

At a time when electrical storage is making its mark on the market, thermal batteries are also making their way. Already very useful for heating buildings and conserving electricity, they will soon be used to increase vehicle autonomy.

Maximize self-consumption

The battery is the size of a small fridge. Grégory Meys, co-founder of the start-up Destore which produces it, suggests placing it in the boiler room of single-family dwellings and apartment or office buildings. The objective is twofold: to improve the energy efficiency of buildings and to facilitate self-consumption of the energy produced by heat pumps or photovoltaic panels. More generally, thermal batteries are used to store heat or cold to meet subsequent heating or air conditioning needs. They also allow you to transform…

The battery is the size of a small fridge. Grégory Meys, co-founder of the start-up Destore which produces it, suggests placing it in the boiler room of single-family dwellings and apartment or office buildings. The objective is twofold: to improve the energy efficiency of buildings and to facilitate self-consumption of the energy produced by heat pumps or photovoltaic panels. More generally, thermal batteries are used to store heat or cold to meet subsequent heating or air conditioning needs. They also make it possible to convert excess electricity into heat. “Our battery is capable of storing the equivalent of 6 to 8 hours of thermal consumption. This is used to produce heat when energy is available and cheaper,” explains Grégory Meys. Its storage solution should be ready in 2023. The research team of ULiège thermodynamicist Vincent Lemort is working on an idea of ​​this type. It consists of transforming electricity using a reversible heat pump, then transforming this heat back into electricity. “This method has the advantage of costing less, having a longer lifespan and not using materials that are rare or harmful to the environment,” explains the professor. Others are at a slightly more advanced stage. We can cite the Flamco battery composed of inorganic salt or the Inelio based on reactive capsules filled with gas. The electric boiler linked to the boiler is in fact already a form of thermal battery. “The boiler allows water to be heated between 20 and 60°C and to keep this heat over time without consuming energy”, adds Vincent Lemort. Thermal storage can also be integrated into industrial processes. Batteries based on molten salts, rock or oil make it possible in particular to maintain temperatures of several hundred degrees Celsius. Mobile applications are also possible. Vincent Lemort takes the example of electric vehicles. “If an electric battery is too cold, it loses capacity and power. If it is too hot, it risks degrading. The battery must therefore be kept in a temperature range between 20 and 40°C. If we can storing heat or cold in the vehicle to heat or cool the passenger compartment or the battery, this increases the vehicle’s range.” The energy system is moving towards an increasingly renewable mix. In this context, storage becomes a pillar of security of supply. “Especially since the legislation should, in the coming years, encourage self-consumption. Or at the very least dissuade energy producers from sending their electricity back to the network via a tax system”, concludes Grégory Meys.

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